L.A. Sentinel: Why Mayor Aja Brown Deserves Our Vote



Los Angeles Sentinel Editorial Board
June 1, 2017

Make no mistake about it, the city of Compton is moving forward and not backward and the decision before Hub City voters on Tuesday, June 6 is a simple one. Who is best to continue leading Compton forward in the 21st century?

Over the past four years, Compton has seen a renaissance and renewed interest in the care of the city and its residents from those in city hall. The city’s deficit was reduced from $43 million to $36 million. Balanced budgets have been passed. 2015 saw Compton’s lowest number of homicides in over 20 years. Compton no longer has hourly motel rentals in an effort to suppress human trafficking and prostitution. More options for healthy eating have made their way into Compton and jobs for residents are now mandatory for new businesses opening up in the city. Voters approved Measure P to aid in the fight against Compton’s notorious potholes and aging street infrastructure and even though personality politics have tried to block the voters’ will in fixing the streets, for the first time in a long time there is a plan and the money to back it up to get the work done.

It’s for all of these reasons and more that we see no need in a change in leadership in Compton’s top office. Mayor Aja Brown has made good on her promises from four years ago and despite being fought every step of the way with baseless, unfounded and blatantly untrue accusations. She has persevered and stayed the course to the betterment of Compton.

Mayor Brown’s opponent is simply unfit for the job and brings with him too much baggage and uncertainty. Charged with public corruption and with a trial expected to start later this month, former mayor Omar Bradley told a judge that he was running for mayor to make a living and take care of his family.

The salary for mayor in the city of Compton is $600 a month and has been since 2015 when the city council elected to end the decades old tradition of getting paid for attending commission meetings. Add to that Bradley’s recent controversial comments about women being unable to lead–that they just get in the way–and the real possibility of seeing a repeat of the Hub City Solid Waste scandal that cost the city over $22 million dollars and saw Bradley and several of his relatives receiving kickbacks, putting Omar Bradley back into office is a risk that Compton voters can’t afford in 2017.

The rumor mill is strong in Compton. There is no jail being built in Compton at the Old Brickyard site–UPS and a Best Buy distribution center are the anchor tenants. Mayor Brown hasn’t stolen anyone’s home–in fact after complaints from neighbors, the city of Compton stepped in and helped an elderly resident who was unable to care for his property get much needed assistance. Yes, Mayor Brown does live in Compton and is about to celebrate ten years in her residence. No she isn’t paid $60,000 a year. She makes $600 a month–which in our opinion is truly public service for the work that she has done.

Instead of feeding into and believing the rumor mill, Compton residents should attend or at least watch the weekly council meetings to see how their city is being governed by their five-member city council.

There is more to local elected office than just holding events for photo taking opportunities. The position is what you make of it. In the past four years, only one person on Compton’s city council has consistently brought forth new programs, policies, partnerships and funding to improve the quality of life for Compton residents and that’s Mayor Aja Brown. Mayor Brown’s colleagues should spend less time playing personality politics and standing in the way of progress for their residents and more time on developing policies and programs that benefit their individual districts. What they were elected to do.

We believe Mayor Brown is a cutting edge twenty-first century leader and the city of Compton needs a fresh infusion of visionary leadership. We encourage Compton voters to re-elect Mayor Aja Brown on Tuesday, June 6 and vote to finish the work.

Source: Los Angeles Sentinel



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